Course Descriptions

Data Science

The following are courses in the Graduate Certificate in Data Science program:

DS 701: Introduction to Data Science

Required course Graduate Certificate

The increasing abundance of data in all areas of society has led to a major need for professionals trained in the proper collection, management, and analysis of data. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of data science, with a focus on the application of these principles to answer questions in a wide variety of fields. Specific attention will be given to the definition of data, finding appropriate data sources, methods for collecting data, and how data is processed after it has been collected (cleaning, coding, and manipulation). Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to begin exploring data on their own and to take more advanced data science courses. 

DS702: Data Collection and Management, and Coding

Required course Graduate Certificate

This course will introduce students to the practical aspects of working with data. Students will explore different methods for data collection, data management, and data documentation. Throughout the course, students will get firsthand experience in these different areas by working with real and simulated data. At the end of the course, students will be prepared to begin collecting, managing, and coding data on their own.

DS 703: Biostatistical Analysis

Required course Graduate Certificate

Understanding biostatistics makes it possible to perform analyses to understand the relationships among data. In this course, students will review foundational areas in statistics including probability, measures of central tendency, p-values, type I and type II errors, confidence intervals, and different types of distributions. The course will also enable students to perform biostatistical analyses including chi-square, t-tests, correlation, linear regression, logistic regression, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Confounding and effect modification will also be covered. Students will also learn how to present data visually in tables and graphs. The course will prepare students for developing an understanding of more advanced biostatistical analyses, reading and interpreting the biostatistical literature, and performing their own studies. 

DS 704: Introduction to Statistical Programming 

Required course Graduate Certificate

Programming is a central component of managing and analyzing data. In this course, students will be introduced to programming using the SAS statistical software program. Students will learn how to perform data management tasks to import and export data, recode variables, and reformat data. Students will also be introduced to basic statistical procedures including  calculating descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression. After taking the course, students will be prepared to complete tasks and to learn more advanced procedures in SAS. 

Genomics

The following are courses in the Genomics Masters program, and Graduate Certificate in Genomics program:

GN 701: Intro to Genomics

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

This course explores the history of genetics and genomics. Family history is discussed as a vital part of a genetic risk assessment and tool for evaluation of inheritance patterns and penetrance of disease. The course concludes with a review of the epigenetic influences on health and epidemiologic approaches to evaluate health and disease and applications in genomics. 

GN 702: Genetic Concepts Testing and Translation to Healthcare

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

The course will serve as the basis for the healthcare professional to integrate genetics and genomics into personalized healthcare. The course will provide the clinician a review of sources of information available to the student in genomic healthcare for clinical management and therapeutic applications. 

GN 703: Ethical, Legal, Social Issues in Genomics and Pharmacogenomics

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

This course exposes students to the ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding genetic testing and genetic testing available in a direct‐to‐consumer approach. Approaches to engage individuals as partners in healthcare will be explored in the course, as will the expanding applications of pharmacogenomics.

GN 704: Cancer Genomics and Applications of Genomics in Health and Disease

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

This course exposes the student to the role of genetics and genomics in cancer diagnosis prognosis and treatment. Future directions of genetics and genomics with comprehensive genome/exome/transcriptome sequencing in oncology, polygenic risk scores cell-free DNA, and genome-wide and phenome-wide association studies are addressed. Genomic technologies and ̀computational approaches that are driving advances to manage health and treat disease will be reviewed. 

GN 710: Principles of Genetics 

Required course for MS

This course provides students an introduction to genetics with a focus on transmission and molecular genetics. The course makes use of bioinformatics to explore gene function and covers pertinent applications of bioinformatics and genetics to modern biological problems. Topics include chromosome structure and replication, variations and extensions of transmission genetics, genetic linkage and mapping, regulation of gene expression, epigenetics, genetic mutations, genetics of cancer, and the principles of genetic engineering.

GN 715: Chromosomes and Human Disease

Required course for MS

This course exposes students to the role of chromosomes in human disease and seeks to familiarize students with the field of cytogenetics, the study of chromosomes, including the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities and human disease. Topics covered include cytogenetic methodology, aneuploidy, chromosome rearrangements, chromosomes and cancer, chromosome breakage syndromes, and fragile sites on human chromosomes.  

GN 720: Molecular Basis of Human Inherited Disease

Required course for MS

This course seeks to familiarize students with the molecular basis of diseases of human genetics and applications to modern research. This course provides a comprehensive examination of the principles of human inheritance, in the context of both normal human variation and human disease. The course explores mechanisms of gene regulation and introduces students to recombinant DNA and protein expression techniques. 

GN 725: Clinical Applications of Genetics and Genomics 

Required course for MS

The course focuses on the genetic basis of disease and cytogenic analysis for applications to clinical care. Diagnostic molecular approaches and the clinical translation of genetic and genomic health information in a personalized healthcare environment are explored. 

GN 730: Evolutionary Analysis 

Required course for MS

This course introduces students to evolutionary science and population genetics subject matter on the importance of four factors: selection, migration, mutation, and genetic drift. Students evaluate human evolution and impact on health. 

GN 735: Human Population Genetics 

Required course for MS

Sequencing of the human genome has led to an emergence of population genomics. The course covers the basics of population genomic analysis from SNP data to the key analyses that may be required to successfully analyze a population genetic data set. Population genetics topics will also include computational methods and machine learning techniques. 

GN 740: Public Health Genetics 

Required course for MS

Public health ensures the basic conditions required for individual and population health are present. The role of genetics in public health is evolving, as is the understanding of genetic disease. This course provides students with advances in genetic knowledge and technology that could be used to prevent disease and improve public health.  

GN 745: Genomic Statistics and Research 

Required course for MS

This course provides students an introduction to the statistical approaches used in solving problems in genetic epidemiology. Methodological expositions and practical guidelines for software selections are included. Topics include molecular genetics and Mendelian description principles, genetic markers and distances, model-based and model-free population and family-based (genome wide) association studies, and association analysis using haplotypes.  


Health Administration

The following are courses in the Health Administration Masters program, and the Graduate Certificate in Health Administration:

HA 701: Introduction to Health Delivery and Administration

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

This course discusses the broad structures and functions of the U.S. health system with careful examination of services, cost, and quality of healthcare. Students will gain a thorough appreciation for the evolution of our healthcare system through time, as a function of U.S. values, scientific discovery, and world events. The curriculum will provide an overview of a wide array of features of the U.S. healthcare system such as long-term care, public health, healthcare financing, the healthcare workforce, technology, and managed care. Further, students will gain deeper understanding of major historical healthcare policies impacting our current delivery system, the current status of provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and the future of healthcare reform.

HA 702: Understanding Health Information Systems

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Understanding Health Information Systems is the second course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology, hardware, and software used in health information technology (HIT). Next, you are introduced to electronic health records (EHRs) to develop an understanding of their advantages and challenges. You also learn about how data are organized in an EHR. Then, you learn about the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and how it is used in decision-making. The course then shifts to data analytics, as you explore the various sources of data used in HIT and how data are used in different types of healthcare facilities. Furthermore, you learn about the importance of interoperability and the challenges of making systems work together. The course ends by examining how the underlying concepts in the Foundation of Knowledge model and the data-information-knowledge-wisdom (DIKW) paradigm help transform data and information into knowledge and wisdom. 

HA 703: Healthcare Law, Regulation & Ethics

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

The inextricable link between the healthcare delivery system and law requires healthcare administrators to be experts in a breadth of legal and regulatory issues. This course will introduce students to the legal and ethical issues affecting the administration and delivery of healthcare services. Students will be familiarized with the U.S. legal system, major legal issues pertaining to the management of healthcare institutions, regulations surrounding quality of care, the impacts of the Affordable Care Act, and ethical issues in health administration. Specific attention will be given to common legal and ethical issues encountered in the healthcare environment, including antitrust laws, patient privacy, end-of-life care, and malpractice. Students will become familiar with the responsibility of healthcare organizations to comply with government regulations and the important role of ethics committees for decision-making in healthcare delivery. 

HA 704: Healthcare Quality Improvement

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Stakeholders at all levels rely upon healthcare administrators to deliver safe and high-quality services in the healthcare organization. Further, the move toward value-based care has driven providers to conduct more rigorous evaluation of patient safety and performance. In this course, students will explore the principles of quality management and quality improvement. Utilizing case studies and other learning methodologies, this course will discuss quality improvement models, project teams, collaboration, and systems within the healthcare organization that provide a foundation for delivering safe, high-quality healthcare. The curriculum will provide an overview of the principles of and practical tools for quality improvement, including the strategies of Lean Six Sigma and the Toyota model of quality management. Students will also learn essential management practices for adopting and implementing performance goals for lasting process improvements, strategies for assessing population health, procedures for safe discharge planning, laws and regulations related to healthcare quality, and an understanding of value-based purchasing. 

HA 710: Advanced Financial Management in Healthcare

Required course for MS

Planning, monitoring, and controlling the finances of a healthcare organization is the responsibility of healthcare management at all levels. In today’s complex healthcare industry, administrators must have a firm comprehension of the basic principles and procedures of financial management. This course will utilize case studies from an array of healthcare settings—long-term care, home health, and hospitals—to demonstrate tools used for financial monitoring, budgeting, forecasting, and strategic planning. Students will explore practical procedures for quantifying revenues and expenses, constructing capital expenditure and operating budgets, and analyzing financial trends. Updated concepts such as big data, meaningful use, ICD-10, and value-based care will also be examined through a financial management lens. 

HA 715: Healthcare Marketing and Strategic Planning

Required course for MS

It is crucial for administrators and managers in healthcare to comprehend marketing principles and know how plan for their organization strategically with full market awareness. Leaders in healthcare know their consumers, identify their market, communicate the organization’s value, and meet the consumers’ needs. This course will provide the backdrop for marketing, including exploring the internal and external influences on strategic planning, strategies for segmenting the market, branding, and data analysis. In addition, students will be introduced to a step-by-step guide through the marketing process while also being made aware of challenges inherent in a competitive marketplace. Students will have opportunities, through case study analyses, to apply marketing principles to real-world scenarios, determining precisely which marketing strategies to use in a range of situations. 

HA 720: Managerial Epidemiology and Population Health for Healthcare Organizations

Required course for MS

New regulations and policies, the passage of the Affordable Care Act, new reimbursement schemes, emerging infectious diseases, and introduction of ICD-10 coding has greatly impacted the U.S. healthcare system, requiring the adoption of new research principles for the healthcare administrator.  This course provides an introduction to population health studies (epidemiology) for healthcare management. Students will learn the basic principles of epidemiology, strategies for data analysis, and applications of epidemiology to the planning, evaluation, and management of healthcare for populations. In addition, students will be introduced to the primary metrics collected and analyzed in a variety of healthcare settings—hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency departments, and physician practices—in order to ensure that effective and safe services are being delivered. 

HA 725: Operations Management in Healthcare

Required course for MS

The U.S. healthcare system and individual organizations face many challenges, including rising costs and unequal access. These and other dilemmas are addressed in this course, Operations Management in Healthcare. This course provides a comprehensive analysis of the many aspects of healthcare operations management, including organization finances, patient flows, inventory management, supply chain management, and process improvement. Students will explore ways in which healthcare administrators direct the complexities of the healthcare organization and all of its elements—patients, stakeholders, providers, payers, and government regulators. In addition, students will be introduced to concepts of research and data analytics for decision-making to improve quality and efficiency. 

HA 730: Organizational Behavior, Leadership & Human Resource Management

Required course for MS

Effective management within today’s dynamic and evolving healthcare industry requires an in-depth understanding of human dynamics in the workplace and skills to effectively lead teams and organizations for process improvement. Students will be introduced to the study of individual and group behavior in healthcare settings. Utilizing case studies and other learning methodologies, students will gain a deeper understanding of leadership models used for motivating employees toward positive change, meeting organizational objectives, and job satisfaction. Further, this course will provide an overview of major human resource functions, such as staffing, training and development, employee relations, and long-range planning.  

HA 790: Health Administration Master’s Capstone 

Required course for MS

The American College of Healthcare Executives has identified essential competencies for the health care executive within five major domains: communication and relationship management, leadership, professionalism, knowledge of the health care environment, and business skills and knowledge.  Students completing their capstone project are expected to display these competencies at a novice level. The novice level is defined by ACHE as “an individual’s primary focus is understanding and gaining information in order to comprehend the skills needed. You have the level of experience gained in a classroom setting or on-the job training. You are expected to need help when performing this skill.”  Upon completion of the coursework required for the master of health administration degree, the capstone project is the culmination of a student’s experience, in which content from every course is integrated. The capstone project requires identifying a current problem in a real-world health care setting and the synthesizing and application of the skills and knowledge gained in this academic program to develop practical solutions. The product of this in-depth analysis will be a comprehensive report and formal presentation. Through the report and presentation, students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. health delivery system and major business concepts; critical thinking; effective written and oral communication skills; leadership and professionalism; strategic planning; and quantitative skills in the analysis of population health, economics, financial management, and quality assessment. 

HA 750: Business Communication for Healthcare Administrators

Elective course for MS

Written and verbal communication strategies are central to effective management as well as in  the delivery of important health-related information aimed at improving patient outcomes and  safety. This course will provide students with essential written and spoken communication strategies used in business, public health messaging, and health care delivery. Students will gain confidence in their short written communication (emails, memos, summary statements) and long written communication (reports), as well as greater comfort with public and one-on-one speaking. This course will explore ways in which communication is used most effectively for problem-solving, leadership, and research. Finally, students will gain a stronger grasp of communication skills important for effective management, such as briefings, persuasion, and conflict management.

IF 701: Introduction to Health Informatics

Elective course for MS

Introduction to Health Informatics works as an introductory class in two ways: first, it launches your study of health informatics, and second, it commences your work in this MS program. Appropriately, the course itself begins with basics of health informatics and its related professional roles. From there, you investigate health informatics’ past, present, and future, and begin building your understanding of theories and research that apply to both health information technology (HIT) and evidence-based practice (EBP). Next, you examine administrative and clinical health information systems, including electronic health records (EHRs). In the next few weeks of the course, you consider topics such as the security and privacy of data, the quality of care, and the safety of patients. You conclude your work in this first course by exploring the engagement and experience of patients, as well as the emerging technologies and trends relevant to health informatics.

HA 751: Emergency Management in Healthcare

Elective course for MS

It is essential that healthcare organizations identify their emergency planning needs and develop an effective level of preparedness strategies in a variety of public health crises. This course aims to help current and future healthcare administrators develop emergency management and operations plans for hospitals and healthcare systems. Case studies will include lessons learned in actual emergency management planning and emergency responses to incidents such as natural disasters, terrorism, and public health emergencies. Students will be introduced to legal and regulatory issues associated with emergency preparedness and response, hospital logistics and laboratory operations, the roles of healthcare personnel, risk communication and media relations, integrating emergency response with other community resources, physical infrastructure security and safety, triage principles, and infectious disease containment.  

DS 701: Introduction to Data Science

Elective course for MS

The increasing abundance of data in all areas of society has led to a major need for professionals trained in the proper collection, management, and analysis of data. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of data science, with a focus on the application of these principles to answer questions in a wide variety of fields. Specific attention will be given to the definition of data, finding appropriate data sources, methods for collecting data, and how data is processed after it has been collected (cleaning, coding, and manipulation). Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to begin exploring data on their own and to take more advanced data science courses.  

GN 701: Intro to Genomics

Elective course for MS

This course explores the history of genetics and genomics. Family history is discussed as a vital part of a genetic risk assessment and tool for evaluation of inheritance patterns and penetrance of disease. The course concludes with a review of the epigenetic influences on health and epidemiologic approaches to evaluate health and disease and applications in genomics. 


Health Informatics

The following are courses in the Health Informatics Masters program, and Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics program:

IF 701: Introduction to Health Informatics

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Introduction to Health Informatics works as an introductory class in two ways: first, it launches your study of health informatics, and second, it commences your work in this MS program. Appropriately, the course itself begins with basics of health informatics and its related professional roles. From there, you investigate health informatics’ past, present, and future, and begin building your understanding of theories and research that apply to both health information technology (HIT) and evidence-based practice (EBP). Next, you examine administrative and clinical health information systems, including electronic health records (EHRs). In the next few weeks of the course, you consider topics such as the security and privacy of data, the quality of care, and the safety of patients. You conclude your work in this first course by exploring the engagement and experience of patients, as well as the emerging technologies and trends relevant to health informatics.

IF 702: Understanding Health Information Systems

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Understanding Health Information Systems is the second course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology, hardware, and software used in health information technology (HIT). Next, you are introduced to electronic health records (EHRs) to develop an understanding of their advantages and challenges. You also learn about how data are organized in an EHR. Then, you learn about the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and how it is used in decision-making. The course then shifts to data analytics, as you explore the various sources of data used in HIT and how data are used in different types of healthcare facilities. Furthermore, you learn about the importance of interoperability and the challenges of making systems work together. The course ends by examining how the underlying concepts in the Foundation of Knowledge model and the data-information-knowledge-wisdom (DIKW) paradigm help transform data and information into knowledge and wisdom

IF 703: Data Management and Utilization

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Data Management and Utilization is the third course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology related to data storage and collection and data analytics. In addition, you learn about the emerging technologies used for data analysis. You will learn about data information, data governance, and the ethical considerations of the electronic health record (EHR). In addition, you learn how databases are used to store and collect information. The course then shifts to data analysis, as you explore the types of statistical software used to examine healthcare data. You will learn about data mining and how it is used to look for patterns and trends in healthcare data. Next, you examine the types of data collected in different healthcare facilities and how data is used in decision making and evidence-based practice. The course ends by examining decision support systems (DSSs), the major types of standardized language terminologies used in healthcare, and the certification processes required for interoperability capabilities.

IF 704: Strategic Planning in Health Informatics

Required course for MS and Graduate Certificate

Strategic Planning in Health Informatics is the fourth course in your certificate program. This course reinforces key informatics concepts in relation to relevant management, leadership, and strategic planning mechanisms. The course begins by examining the steps in the strategic planning process. The in-depth examination of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and health information processes that follows includes internal and external audits, needs assessments, requests for information (RFI), and requests for proposals (RFP). You will learn about the process of implementing and evaluating a plan. You will then explore data analytics and how healthcare professionals use data. The course ends by examining healthcare information system (HCIS) standards and information technology (IT) alignment.

IF 710: Advanced Technology in Healthcare Informatics 

Required course for MS

Students in this course will be introduced to a broad overview of advanced technology and its application in healthcare informatics. In this course, students will explore ways the changing technology landscape provides new opportunities to improve healthcare efficiency, quality, and outcomes. Advanced technology topics will include the fundamentals of natural language processing (NLP), machine learning, and opportunities to use other aspects of artificial intelligence and precision medicine in the healthcare setting. The integration of wearable health devices into electronic health records (EHR) provides additional opportunities for students to identify problems and promote health.

IF 715: Connected Health and Patient Engagement 

Required course for MS

Course Description Students in this course will discuss principles of connected health and patient engagement. Modes of connected health include the use of mobile technology (mHealth), consumer health, and social media to devise consumer-centered health solutions to improve health care outcomes. Principles of patient engagement will be integrated to provide a method for patient advocacy and improve health literacy, reinforced by using technology. Students will be provided with a hands-on approach to connected health through the development of a mobile application focused on a leading health indicator as described by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s HealthyPeople2020.

IF 720: Data Management and Clinical Decision Support

Required course for MS

This course builds upon previous work discussing data management, terminology standards, and the principles of clinical decision support. Students will learn to how to apply data terminology standards and the impact of how data standardization affects clinical decision support systems. Students will be able to design their own hypothetical clinical decision support system in an effort to improve at least one of the following aspects of health care: efficiency, quality, and cost. Utilization of already-presented principles of data management will be essential to provide solutions to the downstream effects of data reporting.  

IF 725: Project and Change Management in Healthcare Informatics

Required course for MS 

This course will cover a more in-depth understanding of project and change management, including budget planning, distribution of resources in a project, department design, vendor evaluation, and planning for software implementation and optimization. Students will design a project proposal, create a budget plan that includes identification of resources, create a software training plan, and apply the concepts of project and change management.  

IF 730: Research Methods in Healthcare Informatics

Required course for MS 

In this course, students will gain knowledge regarding research methods and techniques, including evaluating current research. Students will use research methods, including problem identification, formulation of a research question, data analysis methods, reliability and validity, and qualitative and quantitative analysis methods. Students will examine concerns for human research and ethics. Students will also access big data sets to perform secondary data analysis and interpret the results.  

IF 735: U.S. Healthcare Policy and Politics in Informatics 

Required course for MS

This course provides a foundation of health policy analysis with a focus on healthcare informatics-related policies. It provides a method to understand the history of U.S. policy and politics, with a focus on political, economic, and social systems. This course examines local, state, and federal government structures and ways that they affect informatics-related policy.

IF 750: Public Health Informatics and Telehealth

Elective course for MS

Students in this course will use the concepts of informatics in the setting of public health. Students will discuss the importance of surveillance, reporting, and health promotion. Fundamentals of population health informatics and how it intersects with public health informatics will be discussed. Students will also learn about the fundamental concepts in telehealth and its role in health promotion. This course will review concerns of health for groups of people, rather than individuals, to promote positive health outcomes in that population. 

IF 751: Healthcare Quality Improvement

Elective course for MS

Stakeholders at all levels rely upon healthcare administrators to deliver safe and high-quality services in the healthcare organization. Further, the move toward value-based care has driven providers to conduct more rigorous evaluation of patient safety and performance. In this course, students will explore the principles of quality management and quality improvement. Utilizing case studies and other learning methodologies, this course will discuss quality improvement models, project teams, collaboration, and systems within the healthcare organization that provide a foundation for delivering safe, high-quality healthcare. The curriculum will provide an overview of the principles of and practical tools for quality improvement, including the strategies of Lean Six Sigma and the Toyota model of quality management. Students will also learn essential management practices for adopting and implementing performance goals for lasting process improvements, strategies for assessing population health, procedures for safe discharge planning, laws and regulations related to healthcare quality, and an understanding of value-based purchasing. 

GN 701: Intro to Genomics 

Elective course for MS

This course explores the history of genetics and genomics. Family history is discussed as a vital part of a genetic risk assessment and tool for evaluation of inheritance patterns and penetrance of disease. The course concludes with a review of the epigenetic influences on health and epidemiologic approaches to evaluate health and disease and applications in genomics. 

DS 701: Introduction to Data Science

Elective course for MS

The increasing abundance of data in all areas of society has led to a major need for professionals trained in the proper collection, management, and analysis of data. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of data science, with a focus on the application of these principles to answer questions in a wide variety of fields. Specific attention will be given to the definition of data, finding appropriate data sources, methods for collecting data, and how data is processed after it has been collected (cleaning, coding, and manipulation). Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to begin exploring data on their own and to take more advanced data science courses.  

HA 701: Introduction to Health Delivery and Administration

Elective course for MS

This course discusses the broad structures and functions of the U.S. health system with careful  examination of services, cost, and quality of healthcare. Students will gain a thorough  appreciation for the evolution of our healthcare system through time, as a function of U.S.  values, scientific discovery, and world events. The curriculum will provide an overview of a wide  array of features of the U.S. healthcare system such as long-term care, public health, healthcare  financing, the healthcare workforce, technology, and managed care. Further, students will gain  deeper understanding of major historical healthcare policies impacting our current delivery system, the current status of provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and the future of healthcare reform. 

HA 750: Business Communication for Healthcare Administrators

Elective course for MS

Written and verbal communication strategies are central to effective management as well as in the delivery of important health-related information aimed at improving patient outcomes and safety. This course will provide students with essential written and spoken communication strategies used in business, public health messaging, and health care delivery. Students will gain confidence in their short written communication (emails, memos, summary statements) and long written communication (reports), as well as greater comfort with public and one-on-one speaking.  This course will explore ways in which communication is used most effectively for problem-solving, leadership, and research. Finally, students will gain a stronger grasp of communication skills important for effective management, such as briefings, persuasion, and conflict management.