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The following are courses in the Health Informatics, MS program.

Required Courses

IF 701: Introduction to Health Informatics

3 Credits
Introduction to Health Informatics works as an introductory class in two ways: first, it launches your study of health informatics, and second, it commences your work in this MS program. Appropriately, the course itself begins with basics of health informatics and its related professional roles. From there, you investigate health informatics’ past, present, and future, and begin building your understanding of theories and research that apply to both health information technology (HIT) and evidence-based practice (EBP). Next, you examine administrative and clinical health information systems, including electronic health records (EHRs). In the next few weeks of the course, you consider topics such as the security and privacy of data, the quality of care, and the safety of patients. You conclude your work in this first course by exploring the engagement and experience of patients, as well as the emerging technologies and trends relevant to health informatics.

IF 702: Understanding Health Information Systems

3 Credits
Understanding Health Information Systems is the second course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology, hardware, and software used in health information technology (HIT). Next, you are introduced to electronic health records (EHRs) to develop an understanding of their advantages and challenges. You also learn about how data are organized in an EHR. Then, you learn about the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and how it is used in decision-making. The course then shifts to data analytics, as you explore the various sources of data used in HIT and how data are used in different types of healthcare facilities. Furthermore, you learn about the importance of interoperability and the challenges of making systems work together. The course ends by examining how the underlying concepts in the Foundation of Knowledge model and the data-information-knowledge-wisdom (DIKW) paradigm help transform data and information into knowledge and wisdom.

IF 703: Data Management and Utilization

3 Credits
Data Management and Utilization is the third course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology related to data storage and collection and data analytics. In addition, you learn about the emerging technologies used for data analysis. You will learn about data information, data governance, and the ethical considerations of the electronic health record (EHR). In addition, you learn how databases are used to store and collect information. The course then shifts to data analysis, as you explore the types of statistical software used to examine healthcare data. You will learn about data mining and how it is used to look for patterns and trends in healthcare data. Next, you examine the types of data collected in different healthcare facilities and how data is used in decision making and evidence-based practice. The course ends by examining decision support systems (DSSs), the major types of standardized language terminologies used in healthcare, and the certification processes required for interoperability capabilities.

IF 704: Strategic Planning in Health Informatics

3 Credits
Strategic Planning in Health Informatics is the fourth course in your certificate program. This course reinforces key informatics concepts in relation to relevant management, leadership, and strategic planning mechanisms. The course begins by examining the steps in the strategic planning process. The in-depth examination of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and health information processes that follows includes internal and external audits, needs assessments, requests for information (RFI), and requests for proposals (RFP). You will learn about the process of implementing and evaluating a plan. You will then explore data analytics and how healthcare professionals use data. The course ends by examining healthcare information system (HCIS) standards and information technology (IT) alignment.

IF 710: Advanced Technology in Healthcare Informatics

3 Credits
Students in this course will be introduced to a broad overview of advanced technology and its application in healthcare informatics. In this course, students will explore ways the changing technology landscape provides new opportunities to improve healthcare efficiency, quality, and outcomes. Advanced technology topics will include the fundamentals of natural language processing (NLP), machine learning, and opportunities to use other aspects of artificial intelligence and precision medicine in the healthcare setting. The integration of wearable health devices into electronic health records (EHR) provides additional opportunities for students to identify problems and promote health.

IF 715: Connected Health and Patient Engagement

3 Credits
Students in this course will discuss principles of connected health and patient engagement. Modes of connected health include the use of mobile technology (mHealth), consumer health, and social media to devise consumer-centered health solutions to improve health care outcomes. Principles of patient engagement will be integrated to provide a method for patient advocacy and improve health literacy, reinforced by using technology. Students will be provided with a hands-on approach to connected health through the development of a mobile application focused on a leading health indicator as described by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion's HealthyPeople2020.

IF 720: Data Management and Clinical Decision Support

3 Credits
This course builds upon previous work discussing data management, terminology standards, and the principles of clinical decision support. Students will learn to how to apply data terminology standards and the impact of how data standardization affects clinical decision support systems. Students will be able to design their own hypothetical clinical decision support system in an effort to improve at least one of the following aspects of health care: efficiency, quality, and cost. Utilization of already-presented principles of data management will be essential to provide solutions to the downstream effects of data reporting.

IF 725: Project and Change Management in Healthcare Informatics

3 Credits
This course will cover a more in-depth understanding of project and change management, including budget planning, distribution of resources in a project, department design, vendor evaluation, and planning for software implementation and optimization. Students will design a project proposal, create a budget plan that includes identification of resources, create a software training plan, and apply the concepts of project and change management. 

IF 730: Research Methods in Healthcare Informatics

3 Credits
In this course, students will gain knowledge regarding research methods and techniques, including evaluating current research. Students will use research methods, including problem identification, formulation of a research question, data analysis methods, reliability and validity, and qualitative and quantitative analysis methods. Students will examine concerns for human research and ethics. Students will also access big data sets to perform secondary data analysis and interpret the results.

IF 735: U.S. Healthcare Policy and Politics in Informatics

3 Credits
This course provides a foundation of health policy analysis with a focus on healthcare informatics-related policies. It provides a method to understand the history of U.S. policy and politics, with a focus on political, economic, and social systems. This course examines local, state, and federal government structures and ways that they affect informatics-related policy.

Elective Courses

DS 701: Introduction to Data Science

3 Credits
The increasing abundance of data in all areas of society has led to a major need for professionals trained in the proper collection, management, and analysis of data. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of data science, with a focus on the application of these principles to answer questions in a wide variety of fields. Specific attention will be given to the definition of data, finding appropriate data sources, methods for collecting data, and how data is processed after it has been collected (cleaning, coding, and manipulation). Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to begin exploring data on their own and to take more advanced data science courses.

GN 701: Intro to Genomics

3 Credits
This course explores the history of genetics and genomics. Family history is discussed as a vital part of a genetic risk assessment and tool for evaluation of inheritance patterns and penetrance of disease. The course concludes with a review of the epigenetic influences on health and epidemiologic approaches to evaluate health and disease and applications in genomics.

HA 701: Introduction to Health Delivery and Administration

3 Credits
This course discusses the broad structures and functions of the U.S. health system with careful examination of services, cost, and quality of healthcare. Students will gain a thorough appreciation for the evolution of our healthcare system through time, as a function of U.S. values, scientific discovery, and world events. The curriculum will provide an overview of a wide array of features of the U.S. healthcare system such as long-term care, public health, healthcare financing, the healthcare workforce, technology, and managed care. Further, students will gain deeper understanding of major historical healthcare policies impacting our current delivery system, the current status of provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and the future of healthcare reform.

HA 750: Business Communication for Healthcare Administrators

3 Credits
Written and verbal communication strategies are central to effective management as well as in the delivery of important health-related information aimed at improving patient outcomes and safety. This course will provide students with essential written and spoken communication strategies used in business, public health messaging, and health care delivery. Students will gain confidence in their short written communication (emails, memos, summary statements) and long written communication (reports), as well as greater comfort with public and one-on-one speaking. This course will explore ways in which communication is used most effectively for problem-solving, leadership, and research. Finally, students will gain a stronger grasp of communication skills important for effective management, such as briefings, persuasion, and conflict management.

IF 750: Public Health Informatics and Telehealth

3 Credits
Students in this course will use the concepts of informatics in the setting of public health. Students will discuss the importance of surveillance, reporting, and health promotion. Fundamentals of population health informatics and how it intersects with public health informatics will be discussed. Students will also learn about the fundamental concepts in telehealth and its role in health promotion. This course will review concerns of health for groups of people, rather than individuals, to promote positive health outcomes in that population.

IF 751: Healthcare Quality Improvement

3 Credits
Stakeholders at all levels rely upon healthcare administrators to deliver safe and high-quality services in the healthcare organization. Further, the move toward value-based care has driven providers to conduct more rigorous evaluation of patient safety and performance. In this course, students will explore the principles of quality management and quality improvement. Utilizing case studies and other learning methodologies, this course will discuss quality improvement models, project teams, collaboration, and systems within the healthcare organization that provide a foundation for delivering safe, high-quality healthcare. The curriculum will provide an overview of the principles of and practical tools for quality improvement, including the strategies of Lean Six Sigma and the Toyota model of quality management. Students will also learn essential management practices for adopting and implementing performance goals for lasting process improvements, strategies for assessing population health, procedures for safe discharge planning, laws and regulations related to healthcare quality, and an understanding of value-based purchasing.